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Candlelights Concert at St. Ephrem Church: Bach, Mozart, Chopin, Liszt

Paris, Eglise Saint‐Ephrem — Main Hall

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$ 33

About the Event

For an extraordinary evening of piano classics, visit the impressive Eglise Saint‐Ephrem in Paris to hear the masterpieces of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Johann Sebastian Bach, Frederic Chopin and Franz Liszt.

Practical Information

Reduced price applies to students and unemployed people with valid ID.

Program

  • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – Sonate n° 8
  • Johann Sebastian Bach – Suite française n° 5
  • Frederic Chopin – Nocturnes opus 15
  • Franz Liszt – Mephisto Waltz
Program is subject to change

Artists

Piano: Gabriel Cassagnes

Eglise Saint-Ephrem

Located in a secluded corner of Paris’ historical fifth arrondissement, also known as the Latin Quarter, this small, quaint church is truly a hidden gem. Constructed in 1733 in true Corinthian style, the church was used by different religious orders until the late 19th century, when it became a centre for the Catholic social movements founded by Robert and Albert de Mun. The interior is classically embellished with an impressive collection of paintings. Church Saint-Ephrem is a popular venue for classical music concerts, as its cosy, intimate atmosphere and great acoustics attract both locals and tourists.

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Perhaps the most important composer of all time, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was an Austrian composer of the late 18th century. Born in 1756 in Salzburg, he showed prodigious musical talent from childhood. Beginning at five years of age, he composed more than 600 works, including concertos, symphonies, religious works and operas before his premature death at the age of 35. Hi influence over successive generations cannot be overestated - Ludwig van Beethoven wrote of Mozart "posterity will not see such a talent again in 100 years”. Despite the immense success of his compositions, and the acclaim he received across Europe, Mozart achieved little financial security and rwas buried in an unmarked grave in Vienna's St Marx Cemetery.

Johann Sebastian Bach

The name Bach and the word musician had long been synonyms in Germany as the world saw 56 musicians from this kin. But it was Johann Sebastian Bach, a genius composer and virtuoso organ player, who shed lustre on his family name. He was born on th 31st of March 1685 in Eisenach, a small town in Thuringia. At the age of 10 he became an orphan and was brought up by his elder brother Johann Christoph, who was an organist in a neighbouring town. His brother was the one to teach music to the young Johann Sebastian. Later he moved to Luneburg where he attended a church school and mastered the techniques of playing violin, viola, piano and organ by the age of 17. Besides that, Bach was a choir singer and later after his voice broke he became a chanter’s assistant. In 1703 Bach was hired as a court musician in the chapel of Duke Johann Ernst III. He earned such a good reputation there that he was later invited to Arnstadt to be an organist at the New Church, where he wrote his best organ works. In 1723 he moved to Leipzig to be a chantor at St. Thomas Church where he stayed until his death of a stroke in 1750. In the year of his death he had undergone unsuccessful eye surgery which lead him to lose his eyesight. During that strenuous time his second wife Anna Magdalena helped him to write his last musical pieces. Bach’s artistic legacy is vast. He created compositions in all genres of the time: oratorias, cantatas, masses, motets, music for organ, piano and violin.

Frederic Chopin

Frederic Chopin was a Polish composer and pianist of the Romantic area (early 19th century). He wrote primarily piano solos but also piano concerts, chamber pieces and songs set to Polish lyrics. He is well-known as a poetic genius without competition of his generation. In fact, he created the concept of instrumental ballade and his performances were noted for their sensitivity and fine distinction. He spent most of his life in Paris, where he performed for the intimate atmospheres of salons. For most of his life, he suffered poor health. As a result, he died quite young at the age of 39, probably of tuberculosis.

Franz Liszt

Franz Liszt was a Hungarian composer, pianist and conductor of the 19th century Romantic era. He was well-known for his prodigious virtuosic skill as a pianist all over Europe. In fact, he was one of the most prominent representatives of the New German School (Neudeutsche Schule) as a composer. Over the course of his career he created extensive and diverse bodies of works that influenced contemporaries and anticipated many 20th-century ideas and trends. For instance, his most notable musical contributions were the invention of the symphonic poem, making radical departures in harmony and developing the concept of thematic transformation as part of his experiments in musical form.

Address

Eglise Saint‐Ephrem, 17, rue des Carmes, Paris, France — Google Maps

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