A Little Night Music Concerts at Capuchin Church

Vienna, Kapuzinerkirche — Main Hall

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About the Event

Hear the mellifluous sounds of classical music by Mozart, Schubert, Brahms, Haydn, Bach and Bruckner at Vienna's treasured and world‐renowned Kapuzinerkirche.

Meet the Vienna Imperial Quartet, where great experience meets the spirit of youth, where masterful playing is passed on to the next generation, where the joy of making music together is passed on to the audience, and where programs are carefully prepared and organized. The members of the Vienna Imperial Quartet play in the most important and renowned orchestras in Vienna, teach at universities and conservatories, and many of them perform regularly as soloists. In the Vienna Emperor Quartet they share the joy of making music together.

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart


Perhaps the most important composer of all time, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was an Austrian composer of the late 18th century. Born in 1756 in Salzburg, he showed prodigious musical talent from childhood. Beginning at five years of age, he composed more than 600 works, including concertos, symphonies, religious works and operas before his premature death at the age of 35. Hi influence over successive generations cannot be overestated — Ludwig van Beethoven wrote of Mozart 'posterity will not see such a talent again in 100 years”. Despite the immense success of his compositions, and the acclaim he received across Europe, Mozart achieved little financial security and rwas buried in an unmarked grave in Vienna's St Marx Cemetery.

Franz Schubert


During his rather short life, Franz Schubert, one of the fathers of romanticism in music, had always been an unappreciated genius who had never received public acclaim. Only his family and friends were delighted by his music, and most of his works were discovered and published only many years after his death. Franz Schubert was born on the 31th of March 1797 in the suburbs of Vienna. His father and eldest brother were amateur musicians and they taught him to play piano and violin. At the age of 11 Schubert was a singer in a choir at the Lichtenthal parish and later auditioned for Antonio Salieri and admitted to the emperor’s choir. During that period young Franz started composing his own works.

However, after his voice broke he had to leave the choir and in 1814 he started working as a teacher in the same parish school as his father. He never stopped composing and 4 years later he decided to quit teaching and devote his life completely to music. He fell out with his father because of that and struggled to make ends meet. In 1818 Schubert went to Vienna, where he met Vogl. Together they gave private concerts in small aristocratic circles, mainly playing Lieder, which Schubert wrote around 600. Franz Schubert gave only one big public concert in his whole life in March 1828, which was very warmly received by the audience. However, his health was deteriorating and in November the same year he died of thyroid fever at the age of 31.

Johannes Brahms


Johannes Brahms was a German composer and pianist of the 19th century who influenced the music of the Romantic period. He composed for voice, piano, symphony orchestra, chamber ensembles and chorus. In fact, his reputation as a composer grouped him with Beethoven and Bach as one of the three Bs of music, in other words one of the greatest figures of classical music. As a matter of fact, Brahms worked with leading performers such as Clara Schumann and Joseph Joachim. As a result, many of his works became staples of the modern repertoire for their uncompromising perfectionism.

Johann Sebastian Bach


The name Bach and the word musician had long been synonyms in Germany as the world saw 56 musicians from this kin. But it was Johann Sebastian Bach, a genius composer and virtuoso organ player, who shed lustre on his family name. He was born on th 31st of March 1685 in Eisenach, a small town in Thuringia. At the age of 10 he became an orphan and was brought up by his elder brother Johann Christoph, who was an organist in a neighbouring town. His brother was the one to teach music to the young Johann Sebastian. Later he moved to Luneburg where he attended a church school and mastered the techniques of playing violin, viola, piano and organ by the age of 17. Besides that, Bach was a choir singer and later after his voice broke he became a chanter’s assistant.
In 1703 Bach was hired as a court musician in the chapel of Duke Johann Ernst III. He earned such a good reputation there that he was later invited to Arnstadt to be an organist at the New Church, where he wrote his best organ works. In 1723 he moved to Leipzig to be a chantor at St. Thomas Church where he stayed until his death of a stroke in 1750. In the year of his death he had undergone unsuccessful eye surgery which lead him to lose his eyesight. During that strenuous time his second wife Anna Magdalena helped him to write his last musical pieces. Bach’s artistic legacy is vast. He created compositions in all genres of the time: oratorias, cantatas, masses, motets, music for organ, piano and violin.

Program

  • Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus – Eine Kleine Nachtmusik KV 525
  • Haydn, Joseph – Kaiserquartett, 2. Satz (Hob. III:77)
  • Schubert, Franz – Ave Maria (Op. 52)
  • Bach, Johann Sebastian – Air
  • Bruckner, Anton – Locus Iste WAB 23
  • Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus – Requiem (KV 626, Auszüge Streichquartettfassung) Lacrimosa, Domine Jesu Christe
  • Brahms, Johannes – Wiegenlied (Op. 49, Nr. 4)
Program is subject to change

Artists

String Quartet: Wiener Kaiserquartett

Address

Kapuzinerkirche, Tegethoffstrasse 2, Vienna, Austria — Google Maps

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